A Transcript Of The Video Study

According to the Chronological Chart Of Bible Books, Deuteronomy is the sixth book which appears on the timeline. We believe it was written by Moses, just prior to his death in the year 1451 BC. It is a divinely inspired book, meaning God breathed out His words through Moses. The words of this book, therefore, are the words of God. They are able to make the Lord’s people wise unto salvation through faith which is in Christ Jesus. They are profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness, that the Lord’s people might be mature in the faith, throughly furnished unto all good works. (2 Tim 3:15-17)

The Greek translators called this book “Deuteronomy”, meaning the “second law”. In essence, the book is a restatement and explanation of the Mosaic Law given to the new generation which would enter the land of Canaan. The Hebrews called this book “Haddeb-harm”, which means “the words”. This is taken from the first verse of the first chapter—“These be the words which Moses spake to all Israel…”. Indeed, the bulk of the book is a record of the words (Mosaic Law) charged upon the nation of Israel. Having said that, there are several historic references, including the last days of Moses’ life.

You will remember, the events recorded in the book of Exodus occurred in a single year; the record of Leviticus occurred in a single month; the events recorded in the book of Numbers occurred within a forty year period; and now, the record of Deuteronomy occurs within a two month time period in the year 1451 BC.

The book is divided into 34 chapters and it takes approximately 2 hours and 25 minutes to read in a single sitting.

There are four main sections to the book of Deuteronomy.

In chapters 1-3, there is a survey and evaluation of Israel’s life during their forty years in the wilderness. This is a historic postview, meaning Moses is reviewing that which has already been recorded in the books of Exodus, Leviticus and Numbers; namely, it’s the history of the children of Israel who were made to wander in the wilderness. The dominant theme of the chapters is that of God’s providence, how He prevented the people from entering the land of Canaan. Herein His faithfulness is demonstrated by His wise decree.

In chapters 4-11, there is a survey and review of Israel’s law. This is a restatement and enforcement of the precepts that had been given by God to the old generation.

In chapters 12-30, the subject is still that of the Mosaic Law, but this time it is a survey and purview of Israel’s law. A fresh application and explanation of the precepts are given to the new generation.

In chapters 31-34, the subject returns to the life of Israel, but this time a survey and evaluation is given of Moses, Israel’s leader. You will remember, God forewarned Moses that he would not enter into the land of Canaan, however, He did permit the prophet to ascend a mountain on the border of the land, and from the summit of Pisgah catch a view of the land God would give to the children of Israel. Henceforth, these chapters pivot on the preview of God’s promises. Herein His faithfulness is demonstrated by His immutable oath. Prior to ascending the mountain, arrangements had already been put in order for Joshua to assume responsibility as leader over the people, thereby preparing the people to enter the land of Canaan upon the death of Moses. And, the book ends with Moses’ death, God Himself burying his body at a place known only to God.

As always, I hope this overview of the book will prove a helpful guide as you read through the content of the book this week.

Turning now to the Framework of Sovereign Grace, let us see how the characters of the book align with God’s masterplan for the ages. According to my count, there are only 15 names mentioned in the book of Deuteronomy.

Six names are connected with God’s elect people—Moses, Caleb, Joshua, Aaron, Eleazar and Miriam.

Four names are connected with the non-elect—King Sihon, King Og, Balaam and Amalek.

Five names are unknown whether they belong to the elect or the non-elect—Jephunneh, Nun, Eliab, Reuben and Beor.

Having already spoken in previous studies on the testimonies of many of these people, I wish to only highlight the testimony of Moses before his death. We read in Deuteronomy 31:1-6: “And Moses went and spake these words unto all Israel. And he said unto them, I am an hundred and twenty years old this day; I can no more go out and come in: also the LORD hath said unto me, Thou shalt not go over this Jordan. The LORD thy God, he will go over before thee, and he will destroy these nations from before thee, and thou shalt possess them: and Joshua, he shall go over before thee, as the LORD hath said. And the LORD shall do unto them as he did to Sihon and to Og, kings of the Amorites, and unto the land of them, whom he destroyed. And the LORD shall give them up before your face, that ye may do unto them according unto all the commandments which I have commanded you. Be strong and of a good courage, fear not, nor be afraid of them: for the LORD thy God, he it is that doth go with thee; he will not fail thee, nor forsake thee.” What a leader! As he walked through the valley of the shadow of death, he thought not of himself, nor of the trepidation of leaving this world for the next, but of the people over whom he had been a prophet and a shepherd. In fact, such was the love Moses had in his heart for the children of Israel, that the thirty-third chapter is a record of the blessing Moses pronounced upon each tribe of the nation. After singling out each tribe, he then drew them all together as one people under God, and with his arms extended spoke upon them these words of blessing in Deuteronomy 33:26-29: “There is none like unto the God of Jeshurun, who rideth upon the heaven in thy help, and in his excellency on the sky. The eternal God is thy refuge, and underneath are the everlasting arms: and he shall thrust out the enemy from before thee; and shall say, Destroy them. Israel then shall dwell in safety alone: the fountain of Jacob shall be upon a land of corn and wine; also his heavens shall drop down dew. Happy art thou, O Israel: who is like unto thee, O people saved by the LORD, the shield of thy help, and who is the sword of thy excellency! and thine enemies shall be found liars unto thee; and thou shalt tread upon their high places.” We then read in Deuteronomy 34:7-12: “And Moses was an hundred and twenty years old when he died: his eye was not dim, nor his natural force abated. And the children of Israel wept for Moses in the plains of Moab thirty days: so the days of weeping and mourning for Moses were ended…And there arose not a prophet since in Israel like unto Moses, whom the LORD knew face to face, in all the signs and the wonders, which the LORD sent him to do in the land of Egypt to Pharaoh, and to all his servants, and to all his land, and in all that mighty hand, and in all the great terror which Moses shewed in the sight of all Israel.”

What a testimony! There arose not a prophet since in Israel like unto Moses, that is, until the fulness of time had come, and God the Father sent forth His Son, made of a woman, made under the law, that He, in the person of the Lord Jesus Christ, might redeem His people from the curse of the law. Yes, my dear friends, the Lord Jesus Christ is a greater prophet than Moses.

You know, as the life and ministry of Moses ends with the book of Deuteronomy, it seems appropriate that we should pause before closing this study, and consider how the Lord Jesus Christ is a greater prophet than Moses. For please remember, the ultimate testimony set forth in the Word of God is the blessed Person and glorious work of the Lord Jesus Christ. Turning to the New Testament, the Apostle Paul underscored the testimony of Christ, as it compares with the life and ministry of Moses, in the third chapter of Hebrews, beginning with verse 1 (Hebrews 3:1-4:2):

“Wherefore, holy brethren, partakers of the heavenly calling…”

Paul is addressing these words to those who have been born again; to those who have been made “partakers of the heavenly calling”; that is, those who have been effectually called by the irresistible grace of the Holy Spirit. And notice, they are called “holy”, because the Spirit of God has united their souls to Christ, with a new nature imparted to the soul, created in righteousness and true holiness. They are also called “brethren”, because they are born into the family of God, partakers of the gospel blessings in Christ. “Wherefore, holy brethren, partakers of the heavenly calling…”

“…consider the Apostle and High Priest of our profession, Christ Jesus;…”

The Lord Jesus Christ is identified as “the Apostle and High Priest”—He is the only Mediator between God and sinners; He is the Messenger of redeeming grace and the great High Priest Who reconciles sinners to God.

The Lord Jesus Christ is also identified as the Apostle and High Priest “of our profession”, meaning that He, in His Person, work and offices is the essence of a believer’s testimony. We do not profess a relationship with God on the basis of our good works, nor do we profess a relationship with God based on our affiliation with a religious group, nor do we profess a relationship with God based on the exercise of free will. No, rather, we profess a relationship with God to be based on the Person and work of the Lord Jesus Christ—the Apostle and High Priest of redeeming grace. And you see, Paul is asking the believer to consider Him—the Lord Jesus Christ—in comparison with that of Moses. “Wherefore, holy brethren, partakers of the heavenly calling, consider the Apostle and High Priest of our profession, Christ Jesus;…”

“…Who was faithful to him that appointed him, as also Moses was faithful in all his house.”

The Lord Jesus Christ was faithful to God the Father, Who had appointed Him to serve as the Mediator and Redeemer of the elect. And so, the Apostle Paul is arguing that as Moses was faithful to the Lord in service of the house of Israel, so the Lord Jesus Christ is faithful to the Father in service of the elect. The Lord Jesus Christ came into this world to save all those that had been given to Him by the Father—He came to save His people from their sins! “Wherefore, holy brethren, partakers of the heavenly calling, consider the Apostle and High Priest of our profession, Christ Jesus; Who was faithful to him that appointed him, as also Moses was faithful in all his house.”

“For this man was counted worthy of more glory than Moses, inasmuch as he who hath builded the house hath more honour than the house. For every house is builded by some man; but he that built all things is God.”

A comparison is here made between the house of Israel over which Moses was only a member, and the house of God’s elect people over which the Lord Jesus Christ is the builder. However glorious a house may be, the designer and builder of that edifice is by necessity greater than the thing built. Henceforth, however great and glorious the elect of God may be, it pales in comparison to the greatness and glory of the Lord Jesus Christ who redeems them and makes them vessels unto mercy! And yes, the Lord Jesus Christ is a greater prophet than Moses, because unlike Moses, Christ is not only the prophet of His people, but He is the author and finisher of their faith! “For this man was counted worthy of more glory than Moses, inasmuch as he who hath builded the house hath more honour than the house. For every house is builded by some man; but he that built all things is God.”

“And Moses verily was faithful in all his house, as a servant, for a testimony of those things which were to be spoken after; but Christ as a son over his own house; whose house are we, if we hold fast the confidence and the rejoicing of the hope firm unto the end.”

Another comparison is made, this time between Moses who was only a servant in the house of Israel, and the Lord Jesus Christ Who is the Son of God over the house of His elect people. A son is greater than a servant, and therefore the Lord Jesus Christ is a greater prophet for His elect people than Moses was for the nation of Israel!

What follows in the chapter is an exhortation to all professing believers in Christ, that they might be sure they are in the faith. They are called upon to make their calling and election sure! For not everyone who calls upon the name of Christ has been truly born again. You will notice, Paul continues to use the people of Israel, and their experiences recorded in the books of Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers and Deuteronomy, as a comparison with the elect of God. “And Moses verily was faithful in all his house, as a servant, for a testimony of those things which were to be spoken after; but Christ as a son over his own house; whose house are we, if we hold fast the confidence and the rejoicing of the hope firm unto the end.”

“Wherefore (as the Holy Ghost saith, To day if ye will hear his voice, harden not your hearts, as in the provocation, in the day of temptation in the wilderness: when your fathers tempted me, proved me, and saw my works forty years. Wherefore I was grieved with that generation, and said, They do alway err in their heart; and they have not known my ways. So I sware in my wrath, They shall not enter into my rest.) Take heed, brethren, lest there be in any of you an evil heart of unbelief, in departing from the living God. But exhort one another daily, while it is called To day; lest any of you be hardened through the deceitfulness of sin. For we are made partakers of Christ, if we hold the beginning of our confidence stedfast unto the end; while it is said, To day if ye will hear his voice, harden not your hearts, as in the provocation. For some, when they had heard, did provoke: howbeit not all that came out of Egypt by Moses. But with whom was he grieved forty years? was it not with them that had sinned, whose carcases fell in the wilderness? And to whom sware he that they should not enter into his rest, but to them that believed not? So we see that they could not enter in because of unbelief. Let us therefore fear, lest, a promise being left us of entering into his rest, any of you should seem to come short of it. For unto us was the gospel preached, as well as unto them: but the word preached did not profit them, not being mixed with faith in them that heard it.”

Ah, my dear friends, what solemn words to hear from the Lord! Here is God’s own interpretation and application of the first five books of the Bible. The self-same gospel—that of sovereign grace—the good news of glad tidings of the Father’s electing love, and the Son’s redeeming grace and the Spirit’s sanctifying power—this gospel has been preached from the beginning throughout the ages to our present generation—“For unto us was the gospel preached, as well as unto them.” However, the gospel only profits those who have been regenerated by the Spirit of God, for only those who have been born again are recipients of saving faith. The gospel has no meaning and is of no spiritual value to those who remain in an unregenerate condition. When the gospel is preached to them, it does not profit them, because it is not mixed with saving faith. I hope you see, my friends, this is the leading message of the book of Deuteronomy! This is the leading message of the book of Numbers! This is the leading message of the book of Leviticus! This is the leading message of the book of Exodus! The Apostle Paul teaches, in Hebrews chapter 3, that we who have been born again are to give thanks unto the Father, which has made us partakers of the inheritance of the saints; He has delivered us from the power of darkness, and has translated us into the kingdom of His dear Son, in Whom we have redemption through His blood, even the forgiveness of sins. The Lord Jesus Christ is greater than Moses, for he is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn of every creature. By Him were all things created, things in heaven, things in earth, visible and invisible. Whether they be thrones, or dominions, or principalities, or powers—all things were created by Christ, and for Christ. He is the co-creator of the covenant of grace, and is therefore the builder and the head of His elect people. And it is on the basis of the covenant headship of Christ that we boldly approach the throne of grace, humbly bowing our knees in prayer, pledging our love and allegiance to He Who reigns supreme in heaven, on earth and in our hearts.

The wondering world inquires to know,
Why I should love my Jesus so;
“What are his charms,” say they, “above,
The objects of a mortal love?”

Yes, my Beloved to my sight,
Shows a sweet mixture, red and white:
All human beauties, all divine,
In my Beloved meet and shine.

White is his soul, from blemish free,
Red with the blood he shed for me;
The fairest of ten thousand fairs;
A sun amongst ten thousand stars.

His head the finest gold excels;
There wisdom in perfection dwells;
And glory, like a crown, adorns,
Those temples once beset with thorns.

Compassions in his heart are found,
Hard by the signals of his wound;
His sacred side no more shall bear,
The cruel scourge, the piercing spear.

His hands are fairer to behold,
Than diamonds, set in rings of gold;
Those heavenly hands that on the tree,
Were nailed, and torn, and bled for me.

Though once he bowed his feeble knees,
Loaded with sins and agonies;
Now on the throne of his command,
His legs like marble pillars stand.

His eyes are majesty and love,
The eagle tempered with the dove;
No more shall trickling sorrows roll,
Through those dear windows of his soul.

His mouth, that poured out long complaints,
Now smiles, and cheers his fainting saints;
His countenance more graceful is,
Than Lebanon, with all its trees.

All over glorious is my Lord,
Must be beloved, and yet adored;
His worth if all the nations knew,
Sure the whole world would love him too!



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