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From Alexander Hislop’s, “The Two Babylons: Romanism And Its Origins”

If Rome be indeed the Babylon of the Apocalypse, and the Madonna enshrined in her sanctuaries be the very queen of heaven, for the worshipping of whom the fierce anger of God was provoked against the Jews in the days of Jeremiah, it is of the last consequence that the fact should be established beyond all possibility of doubt; for that being once established, every one who trembles at the Word of God must shudder at the very thought of giving such a system, either individually or nationally, the least countenance or support. Something has been said already that goes far to prove the identity of the Roman and Babylonian systems; but at every step the evidence becomes still more overwhelming. That which arises from comparing the different festivals is peculiarly so.

The festivals of Rome are innumerable; but five of the most important may be singled out for elucidation—viz., Christmas-day, Lady-day, Easter, the Nativity of St. John, and the Feast of the Assumption. Each and all of these can be proved to be BabyIonian. And first, as to the festival in honour of the birth of Christ, or Christmas…

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William Gadsby loved children which led him to become a strong proponent of Sunday Schools. However, he abhorred the custom of parents and teachers training up children to believe they were Christians without having actually experienced the regenerating work of the Holy Spirit. Although he generally assented to the Baptist Catechism (written by Benjamin Keach and published in 1677), he felt there were answers which misled the unbeliever. Gadsby gave an example of this by referring to the 38th question…

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Q. 1. Who is the only self-existent Being?

A. God is the only self-existent Being.

(Ex 3:14; Ps 90:2; Is 45:5, 22; Jn 8:58)

Q. 2. Ought everyone to believe that there is a God?

A. Everyone ought to believe that there is a God, and it is their great sin and folly who do not.

(Ps 9:17; Ecc 12:13; Mk 16:16; Jn 8:24 & 16:8-9; 2 Thess 2:11-12)

Q. 3. How may we know that there is a God?

A. The works of creation and providence plainly declare that there is a God, but His Word and Spirit only do it effectually to the salvation of His people.

(Job 38 & 39; Ps 19; Jn 16:8-14 & 17:8; 1 Cor 2:10)

Q. 4. What is the Word of God?

A. The Holy Scriptures of the Old and New Testament are the…

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In 1792, Francis Cox, a local farmer and dedicated Christian, built a chapel at his own expense for the purpose of divine worship. This he did in an isolated place called Waddesdon Hill, Buckinghamshire. Three years later, Henry Paice was ordained to the Gospel Ministry and became the first pastor. Within three years of the pastor’s induction, the congregation had grown to sixty-five members. According to a list in a Newspaper article attached to the Church Book, the people who attended the meetings had come from around thirty surrounding villages. In “Strict and Particular”, Kenneth Dix points out: “…as churches were formed and chapels built in their own localities, the need for these people to make a long journey to an isolated chapel in the country no longer existed.” The church dissolved in 1976 and the meeting house…

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A man that is regenerate, consisteth of two men (as a man may say), namely of “the old man,” and of “the new man.” “The old man” is like to a mighty giant, such a one as was Goliath; for his brith is now perfect. But “the new man” is like unto a little child, such a one as was David; for his birth is not perfect until the day of his general resurrection.

“The old man” therefore is more stronger, lusty, and stirring than is “the new man,” because the birth of “the new man” is but begun now, and “the old man” is perfectly born. And as “the old man” is more stirring, lusty, and stronger than “the new man;” so is the nature of him clean contrary to the nature of “the new man,” as being earthly and corrupt with…

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Introduction

4 Oct 2016, by AHB Library

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John Kershaw (1792-1870) was pastor for fifty-two years of Hope Chapel, Rochdale. He exercised a powerful ministry among his flock, and became an influential preacher across the country. Few ministers remain faithful to a single congregation for an extended period—Kershaw committed himself to the same church he attended as a boy. His autobiography, “Memorials of the Mercies of a Covenant God while Traveling through the Wilderness”, is one of the best written of its genre. The following excerpt from this book (third edition) is selected in order to highlight the joy of those that sat under his ministry.

Lines to the Memory of Mr. Kershaw, Fifty-Two Years Pastor of the Church at Hope Chapel, Rochdale, Who Died on the 11th January, 1870, in the 78th Year of His Age.

“A Sinner Saved By Grace”

Robe in black weeds, ye Rochdale saints,
Pour out your wail in sore complaints;
Let sorrow trickle from…

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Preface

3 Oct 2016, by AHB Library

John E Hazelton

“Hold-Fast”

A Sketch of Covenant Truth and Its Witnesses

By: John E. Hazelton

“Hold fast the form of sound words” (2 Tim 1:13)

“An everlasting covenant, ordered in all things and sure” (2 Sam 23:5)

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The following pages are but a slight sketch of a vital subject; they aim in a simple way to show the continuity through the centuries of the testimony to “the faith which was once for all delivered unto the saints” (Jude 3). The Author has, so far as possible, given interesting quotations, bearing upon present-day perils, so that it may be said of each Witness referred to…

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Chapter 1: Sovereign Grace

Chapter 2: The Reformers

Chapter 3: The Puritans

Chapter 4: The Eighteenth Century

Chapter 5: The Church of England

Chapter 6: The Independents

Chapter 7: The Baptists

Chapter 8: Literature

Chapter 9: The Future

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“For by grace are ye saved through faith; and that not of yourselves: it is the gift of God: not of works, lest any man should boast.”—Ephesians 2:8,9

In the crowded synagogue of Capernaum the Lord Jesus Christ, addressing many who had eagerly followed Him because of His miracles, declared, “Therefore said I unto you, that no man can some unto Me, except it were given him of My Father.” Immediately the enmity to the truth of God which is latent in every unrenewed hearted was deeply stirred; for, “From that time many of His disciples went back, and walked no more with Him.” “Will ye also go away?” was the piercing question put to the twelve. “Then Simon Peter answered Him, Lord, to whom shall we go? Thou hast the…

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