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Jared Smith, Bible Doctrine

A Transcript Of The Video Study

Yes, Arminians have produced many diagrams for their framework of doctrine. There are far too many to examine for this study. So I have selected as examples three of the more prominent diagrams.

1. The Romans Road.

The Romans Road to salvation is a free will formula of conversion whereby sinners are led on a path to make a decision for Christ. This diagram receives its name from Paul’s epistle to the Romans, as a number of verses are selected from that epistle in support of the free will formula. The Romans Road to salvation looks something like this…

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A Transcript Of The Video Study

In our previous study, I introduced to you several prominent men and women belonging to the Strict and Particular Baptists of past centuries. The question which now arises—Do the Strict and Particular Baptists have a framework of doctrine around which they organize their teachings?

The answer is yes, they do have a framework of doctrine, which can be extracted from their writings. Now, in my view, these writings should be arranged under one of two general categories—First, the 17th and 18th century preachers, who tended to approach the gospel doctrinally and systematically; Second, the 19th and 20th century preachers, who seemed to be more inclined to approach the gospel practically and experientially. Of course, this is not a hard line of division, for both sets of preachers were doctrinal and practical in their gospel ministries. However, it seems to me that those who ministered during the 17th and 18th centuries gave more attention to the mind and concentrated their efforts on the explanation of truth, whereas those who ministered during the 19th and 20th centuries gave more attention to the heart and focused on the application of truth. I believe the writings of men such as Skepp, Gill and Brine suggest they were largely concerned with how the branches of the gospel fit together as a whole. They seem to be addressing the problem of…

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A Transcript Of The Video Study

In our previous study, I introduced you to a circle of historic churches in England called the Strict and Particular Baptists. From their origin in the early 17th century, this group of churches subscribed to high views of sovereign grace—they were High-Calvinists. Now, you will sometimes hear people tell you that High or Hyper Calvinism represents only a small number of churches during the last several centuries. However, by the turn of the 20th century, there were almost 600 Strict and High-Calvinist Baptists churches scattered around England. This made up one third of all Baptist churches in the country. As you can see from the map, there were 69 chapels in Greater London alone, with another 160 chapels scattered throughout the surrounding counties. You can pause the video and examine the number of Strict and High-Calvinist Baptist chapels in other counties around the country. Of course, the Arminians and Moderate-Calvinists would have you believe High-Calvinist churches have only been few in number, but that is simply untrue. My dear friends, as the map demonstrates, we belong to a long line of faithful believers who shared the same faith and understanding of the gospel as ourselves.

Having said this, these Strict and Particular Baptist men and women are not well known among Christians today. Nowadays, when many Christians think of the outstanding Baptists of earlier centuries, they tend to be more familiar with names such as…

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A Transcript Of The Video Study

In our previous study, we considered the meaning of the label “Hyper-Calvinism”. I pointed out that Hyper-Calvinism is a caricature of High-Calvinism. Hyper-Calvinism is the name used by Arminians and lower ranking Calvinists, based on their misunderstanding of higher views of sovereign grace. High-Calvinism, on the other hand, is the name used by High-Calvinists, which more accurately identifies the teachings of this group of believers.

For this study, I would like introduce you to a group of High-Calvinist churches in England called Strict and Particular Baptists. Allow me to give a little background. These Baptist churches in England emerged between the years 1610 and 1633. At that time, there were two main issues which divided the churches. First, there was a matter connected with the…

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A Transcript Of The Video Study

In our previous study, I pointed out three grading systems for identifying the variant teachings of Arminianism and Calvinism. According to the “scale” classification, there are six measurements—High-Arminianism, Moderate-Arminianism, Low-Arminianism, Low-Calvinism, Moderate-Calvinism and High-Calvinism. Now, it is only natural to ask, What Is Hyper-Calvinism? You notice, it is not listed as a measurement on this scale. In fact, where does Hyper-Calvinism fit within this classification? Should it be placed at the top, as a seventh measurement? Or, should it be placed to the side as an extreme and deviant set of teachings which do not even belong on this grading system? That is actually what many Arminians and lower ranking Calvinists believe. They believe Hyper-Calvinism doesn’t even deserve a place on the scale.

Well, the reason I didn’t include Hyper-Calvinism as a label on this grading system, is because technically speaking, Hyper-Calvinism is a name given to the same group of believers who are also…

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A Transcript Of The Video Study

The simple answer is yes, there are adaptations of Arminianism and Calvinism. However, the answer becomes a little more complicated when attempting to identify the variant teachings of these two frameworks. In an effort to simplify the matter, there are three main categories under which these adaptions of Arminianism and Calvinism may be arranged—First, the “point” classification; Second, the “scale” classification; Third, the “shade” classification. All of this may sound rather technical, but as I hope to show you, it actually explains in a concise form an otherwise bewildering clash of differences between believers on these matters.

Let’s begin with the first category—the “point” classification. The point classification is based on the number of points to which one subscribes. For example, if someone subscribes only to the Preservation of the Saints, otherwise known as Eternal Security, then he/she may identify as a one point Calvinist. Or, a person may subscribe to…

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A Transcript Of The Video Study

In our previous studies, I have drawn a clear distinction between two frameworks of theology—Arminianism and Calvinism. I have sought to show you that Arminianism is based on the philosophy of Humanism, and is therefore the epitome of all false religion; whereas Calvinism is based on the revelation of sovereign grace, which is the essence of all true religion. However, the leading factor which determines whether a sinner will enter into the kingdom of God is the regenerating power of the Holy Spirit; not the substance of a preacher’s sermon or the content of a sinner’s creed. Henceforth, it is possible for a regenerate sinner to subscribe to the teachings of Arminianism, just as it is possible for an unregenerate sinner to subscribe to the teachings of Calvinism.

Now, if we want to distinguish between these frameworks of teaching, then it is helpful to set them side by side horizontally for the purpose of comparison and contrast. And that is what I have done in the foregoing studies. However, if we want to integrate these frameworks of teaching, for the purpose of showing how a regenerate sinner may subscribe to the teachings of Arminianism, then it is helpful to stack one on top of the other vertically.

At the bottom, and separate from the two frameworks, is the philosophy of…

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A Transcript Of The Video Study

In our previous study, I drew a sharp line between these two systems of teaching—Arminianism, which is deeply rooted in the philosophy of Humanism; and Calvinism, which is rooted in the sovereign grace of the TriUne Jehovah. Arminianism, as it has its roots in humanism, is the epitome of false religion; whereas Calvinism, as it has its roots in sovereign grace, is the essence of true religion. The question which therefore follows—are we to conclude, if Arminianism is the epitome of false religion, and if one subscribes to it, then he/she must be a non-Christian?

There are some who take a very strong and harsh view on this question. I know, for instance, of some Arminians who believe all Calvinists are heretics and anti-christs. But I also know of some Calvinists who believe all Arminians are false professors and pharisaical. For example, there is a well known Calvinist from the United States—one whom…

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