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2g Pastor and Deacons

“And I say unto thee, That thou art Peter, and upon this rock I will build my church; and the gates of hell shall not prevail against it. And I will give unto thee the keys of the kingdom of heaven; and whatsoever thou shalt bind on earth shall be bound in heaven: and whatsoever thou shalt loose on earth shall be loosed in heaven …”—Matthew 16:18-19

This passage, Matthew 16:18-19, has been for many centuries a battle-ground of theological controversies. Though millions of the disputants have passed away, the questions which arrayed them against each other still survive to align their successors in hostile array.

The most important of these divisive questions are:

1. What is the church?
2. Who established it and when?
3. What is the foundation?
4. What are the “gates of hell?”
5. What are the “keys?”
6. What is the “binding and loosing?”

In this lecture there will be time for answer to the first question only:

WHAT IS THE CHURCH?

From the given list of passages, taken from the Englishman’s Greek Concordance, and which you may verify by reference to the Bible, it appears that the…

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[In the original Appendix, B. H. Carroll provides a comprehensive overview on how the term ecclesia is used in a wide range of literature (Classic Use, Septuagint, Apocrypha, Old and New Testaments). As the object of uploading Carroll’s overview of the church is to provide a simple examination into the subject, the editor has included only the references found in the New Testament. If you wish to read Carroll’s booklet in full, you may easily find it available with a simple Google search.

The reader is encouraged to examine the 118 references to ecclesia in the New Testament, as it will easily be discovered that they fall into one of three categories—(1) Abstract/Generic; (2) Particular, Local Congregations; (3) Prospective, a Future Congregation when Christ Returns (but even this will be a visible and local congregation, or church).]

NEW TESTAMENT USAGE OF ECCLESIA

Matthew

16:18 – “I will build my church.”
18:17 – “Tell (it) unto the church: but…

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Among the historical confessions of faith, I am most closely aligned with the 1644 First London Baptist Confession of Faith and the 1729 Goat Yard Declaration of Faith. However, I believe fresh statements of faith should be drawn up by every generation, and for that matter, by every individual believer in Christ. To that end, I have condensed the basis of my faith into seventy points.

1. I believe God has plenarily and verbally inspired the Scriptures of the Old and New Testaments.

2. I believe the Scriptures of the Old and New Testaments are without error.

3. I believe the Scriptures of the Old and New Testaments are preserved in the Hebrew Masoretic Text and the Greek Textus Receptus.

4. I believe the most reliable translation in English of the Old and New Testaments is the Authorized Version.

5. I believe the one true and only God is Jehovah.

6. I believe Jehovah exists in three distinct…

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Q. 1. Who is the only self-existent Being?

A. God is the only self-existent Being.

(Ex 3:14; Ps 90:2; Is 45:5, 22; Jn 8:58)

Q. 2. Ought everyone to believe that there is a God?

A. Everyone ought to believe that there is a God, and it is their great sin and folly who do not.

(Ps 9:17; Ecc 12:13; Mk 16:16; Jn 8:24 & 16:8-9; 2 Thess 2:11-12)

Q. 3. How may we know that there is a God?

A. The works of creation and providence plainly declare that there is a God, but His Word and Spirit only do it effectually to the salvation of His people.

(Job 38 & 39; Ps 19; Jn 16:8-14 & 17:8; 1 Cor 2:10)

Q. 4. What is the Word of God?

A. The Holy Scriptures of the Old and New Testament are the…

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In 1792, Francis Cox, a local farmer and dedicated Christian, built a chapel at his own expense for the purpose of divine worship. This he did in an isolated place called Waddesdon Hill, Buckinghamshire. Three years later, Henry Paice was ordained to the Gospel Ministry and became the first pastor. Within three years of the pastor’s induction, the congregation had grown to sixty-five members. According to a list in a Newspaper article attached to the Church Book, the people who attended the meetings had come from around thirty surrounding villages. In “Strict and Particular”, Kenneth Dix points out: “…as churches were formed and chapels built in their own localities, the need for these people to make a long journey to an isolated chapel in the country no longer existed.” The church dissolved in 1976 and the meeting house…

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