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Divinity

Introduction

1 Jun 2015, by Jared Smith

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John Gill was born in Kettering, Northamptonshire, England, on November 23rd, 1697. At age 12, he was converted to Christ under the preaching ministry of William Wallis. However, he waited six years before agreeing to be baptized, after which he became a member of his local church. At the age of 23, he was inducted as pastor of the Strict Baptist Horselydown church, where he remained until his death on October 14th, 1771. His 50 year pastoral ministry was accompanied by a prolific written ministry. Not only is he the only man to…

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Having considered the distinct personality and deity of the Father, attention is now given to that of the Son.

I. The Personality of the Son.

1. Affirmed by Formal Definition.

Personality has been defined by some as, “An individual that subsists, is living, intelligent, is not sustained by another, nor is a part of another.” If this statement be accepted as a formal definition of a person, then it is true of each of the three Persons in the Godhead—Father, Son and Spirit. Of particular note, we shall consider the personality of the Son: (1) “An individual…”—He is an individual, distinct, though not separate from…

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Having considered the distinct personality and deity of the Father and of the Son, attention is now given to that of the Holy Spirit.

I. The Personality of the Holy Spirit.

1. The Holy Spirit is a Real Person.

That the Holy Spirit is a Person, and not a mere name, power or attribute of God, appears most evident under the following heads:

(1) Affirmed by Formal Definition.

Personality has been defined by some as, “An individual that subsists, is living, intelligent, is not sustained by another, nor is a part of another.” If this statement be accepted as a formal definition of a person, then it is true of each of the three Persons in the Godhead—Father, Son and Spirit. Of particular note, we shall consider the personality of the Holy Spirit: (1) “An individual…”—He is an individual, distinct, though not separate from the divine nature, which He has in common with the Father and the Son; (2) “…that subsists…”—He subsists of Himself in that nature…

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