Tag:

Nature

On Sanctification

19 Sep 2017, by AHB Library

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To which of the Divine Persons is the sanctification of the believer attributed?

(1) God the Father, by electing love. There is a sanctification which is more peculiarly ascribed to God the Father; and which is no other than his eternal election of men to it: under the law, persons and things separated and devoted to holy uses, are said to be “sanctified”; hence those who are set apart by God for his use and service, and are chosen by him to holiness here and hereafter, are said “to be sanctified by God the Father” (Jude 1:1).

(2) God the Son, by justifying grace. There is a sanctification also that is more peculiar to Christ the Son of God; not only as he is the representative of his people, and is “holiness to the Lord” for them; which the high priest had upon his forehead, who was a type of him, and the representative of Israel; and as he has the whole stock of grace and holiness in his hands, which is communicated to the saints as is necessary; and as the holiness…

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A man that is regenerate, consisteth of two men (as a man may say), namely of “the old man,” and of “the new man.” “The old man” is like to a mighty giant, such a one as was Goliath; for his brith is now perfect. But “the new man” is like unto a little child, such a one as was David; for his birth is not perfect until the day of his general resurrection.

“The old man” therefore is more stronger, lusty, and stirring than is “the new man,” because the birth of “the new man” is but begun now, and “the old man” is perfectly born. And as “the old man” is more stirring, lusty, and stronger than “the new man;” so is the nature of him clean contrary to the nature of “the new man,” as being earthly and corrupt with…

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Theology is nothing else than speaking of God—his nature, names, perfections, and persons; his purposes, providences, ways, works, and word. As I have undertaken to write a System of Theology, or a Body of Doctrinal Divinity, I shall begin with the Being of God, and the proof and evidence of it.

The Being of God is the foundation of all religion. If there is no superior Being to whom we are accountable for faith and practice, then religion is vain, and it matters not what we believe, nor what we do. There have been some to think that the existence of God should not be admitted as a matter of debate, since the Being of God is a first principle and a self-evident proposition. However, such is the malice of Satan, that he does frequently…

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As it is difficult to understand that nature which belongs to each of God’s creatures, so there is a mystery about the nature of God, the Creator of heaven and earth.

1. Indirect Inferences that there is a Nature in God.

That a “Nature” may be predicated of God is inferred by the Apostle Paul in Galatians 4:8, where these Christians are described, prior to their conversion, as serving idols, who “by nature, were no gods”—as these false gods were assumed to have a nature, so the one true and living God must have a Nature. A similar inference is made by the Apostle Peter in…

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That there is but one God is the first principle of the Christian faith. It is the chief commandment given by God, on which all religion, doctrine and faith depend (Mk 12:28-30). He that says there is more than one God is as much a fool as he that believes there is no God. Indeed, Tertullian observed, “If God is not one, He is not at all.” This premise is a most certain truth, and most surely to be believed, as it is affirmed by the voice of reason and revelation.

1. The Light of Nature.

As the light of nature teaches men there is a God, so it also teaches them there is but one God. This is observable even among those nations which neglected the true God and chose not to retain Him in their knowledge—having been given over to a reprobate mind, or to judicial blindness, to believe the father of lies—they were led by degrees…

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Since God is an uncreated spirit, He is therefore simple, immutable, infinite, omnipresent and eternal. Having considered these attributes, we proceed to look at those divine perfections that are true of Him as an active and operative spirit. The two attributes that belong to all active spirits are life and power. However, these are true of God in an infinite measure—since He is all act, so He has life in Himself and His power is almighty. We shall now consider the life of God.

Some believe this is not a single perfection of the Godhead, but is expressive of all the divine perfections. Indeed, this is true, for as it is His nature and essence, so it is Himself. This applies equally to every other attribute—each perfection is one with His nature and essence. However, the finiteness of our minds require we view…

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