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Reformed

I have selected the seventh chapter, Of God’s Covenant, to demonstrate why I do not subscribe to the 1689 London Baptist Confession of Faith. First, it fails to adequately explain the purpose of a covenant; Second, it makes the gracious covenant subservient to the fall of man; Third, it makes the gracious covenant a free offer to sinners; Fourth, it makes the gracious covenant conditional on the sinner’s faith; Fifth, it implies the gracious covenant is different from the gospel; Sixth, it implies the gracious covenant is different from the eternal covenant; Seventh, it fails to highlight the distinct roles assumed by the Triune Jehovah in the gracious covenant. Henceforth, I believe this statement falls short of giving a concise and accurate account of God’s covenant.

Now, lest I be charged with departing from the orthodox faith, it should be understood…

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This thirty-eighth study explores the persons designated ‘elders’ in the church at Jerusalem. The term is mentioned eight times in three passages: Acts 11:30; 15:2-16:4; 21:18. While the traditional view has regarded these ‘elders’ as holding a special office, such as pastor/bishop, a fresh analysis of the texts suggest these persons were the unofficial leaders comprised of the household heads. It is proposed the traditional view is constructed upon a faulty hermeneutic—reading back into the texts preconceived ideas drawn from subsequent scriptures:

Whereas the right hermeneutic is to interpret the subsequent scriptures by the meaning of the term as first used in Acts 11:30—this principle of interpretation is known as ‘First Mention’ and according to A. T. Pierson is that principle by which “the first occurrence of a word, expression, or utterance, is the key to its subsequent meaning, or it will be a guide to ascertaining the essential truth connected with it.”

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This fifty-fourth study explores the evolution of a plural eldership in a typical Baptist church. The case study is based upon the Metropolitan Tabernacle, which offers an excellent backdrop on when plural elderships were introduced in historic Baptist churches and how they developed in the latter half of the 20th century. This lecture does not aim at exhausting the subject—it is designed to challenge Strict and Particular Baptists to retain their identity by rejecting the hybrid views of the Reformed Baptists.

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An Answer to the Enquiry—“Is Baptism instead of Circumcision? And the Lord’s Supper instead of the Passover?”

A doubter enquires by anonymous letter, to know if “Baptism (or sprinkling) is not instead of circumcision, and the Lord’s supper instead of the passover?” If this person is really sincere in his enquiry, we desire to sympathise with him, and could say “search the Scriptures,” and look up to the Lord in earnest prayer and not to so-called great men’s opinions . . .

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A lecture on the origin of the church.

When the New Testament uses the term “ecclesia” with reference to a community of God’s people, it always and only refers to one of three things: (1) A particular assembly of Jesus Christ on earth, such as, “the church of God which is at Corinth”; (2) Particular assemblies of Jesus Christ addressed collectively, such as, “the churches of Galatia”; (3) The one assembly of Jesus Christ that will be gathered in glory, such as that “glorious church, not having spot, or wrinkle, or any such thing.” The question answered in this study: When did Jesus establish His church?

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A lecture on the ordinance of baptism.

There are two ordinances Christ has established for His church: Baptism and the Lord’s Table. Baptism qualifies a Christian to become a member of the church; the Lord’s Table enables a Christian to maintain his membership with the church. Baptism symbolizes a believer’s submission to the will of God; the Lord’s Table demonstrates a believer’s discipline to the Word of God. This study seeks to provide an overview for the ordinance of Baptism.

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“And there came one of the seven angels which had the seven vials, and talked with me, saying unto me, Come hither; I will show unto thee the judgment of the great whore that sitteth upon many waters; with whom the kings of the earth have committed fornication. So he carried me away in the spirit into the wilderness; and I saw a woman sit upon a scarlet colored beast, full of names of blasphemy, having seven heads and ten horns. And the woman was arrayed in purple and scarlet-color, and decked with gold and precious stones and pearls . . .”—Rev. 17:1-6.

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