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Rome

From Alexander Hislop’s, “The Two Babylons: Romanism And Its Origins”

If Rome be indeed the Babylon of the Apocalypse, and the Madonna enshrined in her sanctuaries be the very queen of heaven, for the worshipping of whom the fierce anger of God was provoked against the Jews in the days of Jeremiah, it is of the last consequence that the fact should be established beyond all possibility of doubt; for that being once established, every one who trembles at the Word of God must shudder at the very thought of giving such a system, either individually or nationally, the least countenance or support. Something has been said already that goes far to prove the identity of the Roman and Babylonian systems; but at every step the evidence becomes still more overwhelming. That which arises from comparing the different festivals is peculiarly so.

The festivals of Rome are innumerable; but five of the most important may be singled out for elucidation—viz., Christmas-day, Lady-day, Easter, the Nativity of St. John, and the Feast of the Assumption. Each and all of these can be proved to be BabyIonian. And first, as to the festival in honour of the birth of Christ, or Christmas…

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17. Luther

14 Feb 2012, by AHB Library

Earthen Vessel 6

“The solitary Monk who shook the world.”


In Germany, the Gospel light,
By Luther shone, when dead of night
Throughout the world did reign;
Rome curs’d, and curs’d, from morn till noon,
As noisy curs howl at the moon,
As senseless and as vain.

In knowledge and in grace increas’d,
The “powers of darkness,” . . .

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Getulicus, Symphorosa With He Sons, Cerialus And Amantius, Put To Death For The Faith, At Frivoli; And Saphira And Sabina At Rome, A. D. 136

Getulicus, a teacher at Frivoli in Italy, Symphorosa with her sons, and Cerialus and Amantius, were put to death in that city for the faith. It is also stated that Saphira, a maiden from Antioch, and Sabina, the widow of Valentinus, had to lay down their lives, at Rome, for the same reason. Joh. Gysii Hist. Mart., fol. 15, col. 4.

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It would seem that the indignities visited by a ruler upon one of his honored subjects, could not be greater than the one which has just been narrated, much less could it be perpetrated by one claiming, as does the pope, to be God’s vicegerent upon earth. Raymond VI., count of Toulouse, however, was subjected to a still more humiliating punishment.

The Albigenses abounded very largely in the territories of this count, and he extended to them his protection and patronage. He was even charged with having imbibed some of their views. This aroused the indignation of the Catholics against him, and he was excommunicated by the pope. Not long after this . . .

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