Tag:

Spirit

A Sermon Preached by Joseph Philpot at Providence Chapel, Eden Street, London, on Tuesday Evening, July 6, 1847

“Abide in me, and I in you. As the branch cannot bear fruit of itself, except it abide in the vine; no more can ye, except ye abide in me.” John 15:4

Have you ever considered the experience of the disciples when their Lord and Master was sojourning here below? To my mind, there is something very instructive, and, I may add, very encouraging in it.

On the one hand, observe how ignorant they were of the nature of Christ’s kingdom! Two of the most eminent of them besought him that they might sit, the one on his right hand, and the other on his left, in his glory. What ignorance did that request imply of the nature of his spiritual kingdom, as if there were a right and a left hand there! Observe, too, their unbelief. How continually the Lord had to chide them! “Where is your faith?” and “O ye of little faith!” Remark also, their carnality and worldly-mindedness. How, on one occasion, two of them asked their Master that fire might come down from heaven to destroy his enemies! and how, at the very first onset of danger, “they all forsook him and fled!” It is, to my mind, very instructive and encouraging, thus to see their weakness, ignorance, and unbelief.

We have taken a hasty glance at the dark side of the question; we have traced out what they were in self. Let us now take another view of their character, and mark something of the…

Continue reading

A man that is regenerate, consisteth of two men (as a man may say), namely of “the old man,” and of “the new man.” “The old man” is like to a mighty giant, such a one as was Goliath; for his brith is now perfect. But “the new man” is like unto a little child, such a one as was David; for his birth is not perfect until the day of his general resurrection.

“The old man” therefore is more stronger, lusty, and stirring than is “the new man,” because the birth of “the new man” is but begun now, and “the old man” is perfectly born. And as “the old man” is more stirring, lusty, and stronger than “the new man;” so is the nature of him clean contrary to the nature of “the new man,” as being earthly and corrupt with…

Continue reading

As it is difficult to understand that nature which belongs to each of God’s creatures, so there is a mystery about the nature of God, the Creator of heaven and earth.

1. Indirect Inferences that there is a Nature in God.

That a “Nature” may be predicated of God is inferred by the Apostle Paul in Galatians 4:8, where these Christians are described, prior to their conversion, as serving idols, who “by nature, were no gods”—as these false gods were assumed to have a nature, so the one true and living God must have a Nature. A similar inference is made by the Apostle Peter in…

Continue reading

As there are three distinct Persons who are the one God, there must be something which distinguishes them from each other. Let it be stated from the outset, that the distinction between the three Persons is not merely nominal or modal. For instance, the Sabellians believe God is one Person, having but three names, or modes of expression. However, if this were true, then there is actually no distinction at all between the Father, Son and Spirit. Just as a man with three names is no more distinguished by one than the other, so if the three Persons are merely names by which God is identified, He is no more distinguished by one than the other.

Rather, the distinction between the three Persons in the Godhead is real and personal. The three Persons are not merely three modes, but three distinct Persons in a different mode of subsisting. They are distinct from each other, so that the Father is not the Son, nor the Son the Father, nor the Holy Spirit either the Father or the Son. (1) As God is a spirit, and therefore indivisible in His Being, so the fulness of the Godhead is…

Continue reading

Having considered the distinct personality and deity of the Father and of the Son, attention is now given to that of the Holy Spirit.

I. The Personality of the Holy Spirit.

1. The Holy Spirit is a Real Person.

That the Holy Spirit is a Person, and not a mere name, power or attribute of God, appears most evident under the following heads:

(1) Affirmed by Formal Definition.

Personality has been defined by some as, “An individual that subsists, is living, intelligent, is not sustained by another, nor is a part of another.” If this statement be accepted as a formal definition of a person, then it is true of each of the three Persons in the Godhead—Father, Son and Spirit. Of particular note, we shall consider the personality of the Holy Spirit: (1) “An individual…”—He is an individual, distinct, though not separate from the divine nature, which He has in common with the Father and the Son; (2) “…that subsists…”—He subsists of Himself in that nature…

Continue reading

Copyright © 2019, The Association of Historic Baptists