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Jared Smith, Bible Reading

A Transcript Of The Video Study

This is the thirty-first study in the series, and we are looking for the last time at the book of Psalms. In our previous studies, I have pointed out the book of Psalms has been divided into five sub-books, often called the Five Books of Psalms.

Book 1: Psalms 1-41 (1 hr, 5 min to read)
• Total 41: David (37); Anonymous (4)
Book 2: Psalms 42-72 (51 min to read)
• Total 31: David (18); Asaph (1); Korah (7); Solomon (1); Anonymous (4)
Book 3: Psalms 73-89 (36 min to read)
• Total 17: David (1); Asaph (11); Korah (3); Ethan (1); Heman (1)
Book 4: Psalms 90-106 (31 min to read)
• Total 17: David (2); Moses (1); Anonymous (14)
Book 5: Psalms 107-150 (1 hr, 10 min to read)
• Total 44: David (15); Solomon (1); Anonymous (28)

For this study, we are looking at the fifth book of Psalms, beginning with Psalm 107 and ending with Psalm 150. It takes one hour and ten minutes to read in a single sitting. This is a total of forty-four Psalms, fifteen of which are ascribed to David, one to Solomon and twenty-eight are anonymous.

In preparation for your reading of this fifth book, I would like to…

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A Transcript Of The Video Study

This is the thirtieth study in the series, and we are looking once more at the book of Psalms. In our previous study, I pointed out the book of Psalms has been divided into five sub-books, often called the Five Books of Psalms.

Book 1: Psalms 1-41 (1 hr, 5 min to read)
• Total 41: David (37); Anonymous (4)
Book 2: Psalms 42-72 (51 min to read)
• Total 31: David (18); Asaph (1); Korah (7); Solomon (1); Anonymous (4)
Book 3: Psalms 73-89 (36 min to read)
• Total 17: David (1); Asaph (11); Korah (3); Ethan (1); Heman (1)
Book 4: Psalms 90-106 (31 min to read)
• Total 17: David (2); Moses (1); Anonymous (14)
Book 5: Psalms 107-150 (1 hr, 10 min to read)
• Total 44: David (15); Solomon (1); Anonymous (28)

For this study, we are looking at the fourth book of Psalms, beginning with Psalm 90 and ending with Psalm 106. It takes 31 minutes to read in a single sitting. This is a total of seventeen Psalms, two of which are ascribed to David, one to Moses and fourteen are anonymous.

In preparation for your reading of this fourth book, I would like to say three things about it.

First, the New Testament quotations.

Of the seventeen Psalms, the New Testament writers quote from…

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A Transcript Of The Video Study

This is the twenty-ninth study in the series, and we are looking once more at the book of Psalms. In our previous study, I pointed out the book of Psalms has been divided into five sub-books, often called the Five Books of Psalms.

Book 1: Psalms 1-41 (1 hr, 5 min to read)
• Total 41: David (37); Anonymous (4)
Book 2: Psalms 42-72 (51 min to read)
• Total 31: David (18); Asaph (1); Korah (7); Solomon (1); Anonymous (4)
Book 3: Psalms 73-89 (36 min to read)
• Total 17: David (1); Asaph (11); Korah (3); Ethan (1); Heman (1)
Book 4: Psalms 90-106 (31 min to read)
• Total 17: David (2); Moses (1); Anonymous (14)
Book 5: Psalms 107-150 (1 hr, 10 min to read)
• Total 44: David (15); Solomon (1); Anonymous (28)

For this study, we are looking at the third book of Psalms, beginning with Psalm 73 and ending with Psalm 89. It takes 36 minutes to read in a single sitting. This is a total of seventeen Psalms, one of which is ascribed to David, eleven to Asaph, three to the sons of Korah, one to Ethan and one to Heman.

In preparation for your reading of this third book, I would like to say three things about it.

First, the New Testament quotations.

Of the seventeen Psalms in the Third Book, the New Testament writers quote from…

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A Transcript Of The Video Study

This is the twenty-eighth study in the series, and we are looking once again at the book of Psalms. In our previous study, I pointed out that the book of Psalms has been divided into five sub-books, often called the Five Books of Psalms.

Book 1: Psalms 1-41 (1 hr, 5 min to read)
• Total 41: David (37); Anonymous (4)
Book 2: Psalms 42-72 (51 min to read)
• Total 31: David (18); Asaph (1); Korah (7); Solomon (1); Anonymous (4)
Book 3: Psalms 73-89 (36 min to read)
• Total 17: David (1); Asaph (11); Korah (3); Ethan (1); Heman (1)
Book 4: Psalms 90-106 (31 min to read)
• Total 17: David (2); Moses (1); Anonymous (14)
Book 5: Psalms 107-150 (1 hr, 10 min to read)
• Total 44: David (15); Solomon (1); Anonymous (28)

For this study, we are looking at the second book of Psalms, beginning with Psalm 42 and ending with Psalm 72. It takes 51 minutes to read these Psalms in a single sitting. This is a total of 31 Psalms, eighteen of which are ascribed to David, one to Asaph, seven to the sons of Korah, one to Solomon and four are anonymous.

In preparation for your reading of the second book of Psalms, I would like to say three things about it.

First, the New Testament quotations.

Of the thirty-one Psalms in the second book, the New Testament writers quote from five of them.

Psalm 44—Psalm 44:22 (Romans 8:36)
Psalm 45—Psalm 45:7,8 (Hebrews 1:8,9)
Psalm 51—Psalm 51:6 (Romans 3:4)
Psalm 68—Psalm 68:19 (Ephesians 4:8)
Psalm 69—Psalm 69:10 (Romans 15:3); Psalm 69:10 (John 2:17); Psalm 69:10 (Romans 11:9,10); Psalm 69:26 (Acts 1:20)

The reason I highlight these quotations is because I want you to remember, as you read through the book of Psalms, it is a gospel book. That is why the New Testament writers frequently quote from the…

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A Transcript Of The Video Study

This is the twenty-seventh study in the series, and we are looking at the book of Psalms. As I have pointed out in the previous studies, the last thirty books of the Old Testament fit into one of three sections of history—the United Kingdom of Israel, the Divided Kingdom of Israel and the Exile/Return of Judah. The book of Psalms fits within the first of these time periods, and is the twelfth book to appear along the timeline.

The book of Psalms is the longest book of the Bible, made up of 150 separate compositions, taking approximately 4 hours and 10 minutes to read in a single sitting. The name of the book—“Psalms”—is taken from the Greek, which refers to a piece of literature designed to be sung with musical instruments. According to the Hebrew language, the book goes by the name of “Praise-Songs” or the “Book of Praises”. In other words, the book of Psalms is the inspired hymn book of the Bible.

And, on the point of inspiration, I must point out as I do with every book of the Bible, the book of Psalms is a divinely inspired book. That is, God breathed out His words through…

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A Transcript Of The Video Study

This is the twenty-six study in the series, and we are looking at the book of 2 Samuel. As you know, the remaining thirty books of the Old Testament fit into one of three sections of history—the United Kingdom of Israel, the Divided Kingdom of Israel and the Exile/Return of Judah. The book of 2 Samuel belongs to the first of these time periods, and is the eleventh book to appear on the timeline.

The time period covered by the book is around 40 years. There are 24 chapters, and it takes approximately 1 hour and 45 minutes to read in a single sitting.

According to 1 Chronicles 29:29,30, we have reason to believe the book was written by two prophets—Nathan and Gad. As you may remember, these men also wrote the last chapters (25-31) of 1 Samuel, so it stands to reason, since originally 1 and 2 Samuel were one book, that Nathan and Gad are the authors also of 2 Samuel.

Apart from the human authorship, 2 Samuel is a divinely inspired book, meaning God breathed out His words through…

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A Transcript Of The Video Study

In our previous study, I pointed out the remaining thirty books of the Old Testament fit into one of three sections of history—the United Kingdom of Israel, the Divided Kingdom of Israel and the Exile/Return of Judah. The book of 1 Samuel belongs to the first of these time periods, and is the tenth book to appear on the timeline.

The time period covered by the book of 1 Samuel is around 115 years. There are 31 chapters, and it takes approximately 2 hours and 5 minutes to read in a single sitting.

We believe there are three authors of the book—Samuel, who wrote chapters 1-24; Nathan and Gad, who wrote chapters 25-31. We read in 1 Samuel 10:25, ”Then Samuel told the people the manner of the kingdom, and wrote it in a book, and laid it up before the LORD.” The death of Samuel is recorded in the twenty-fifth chapter, which means the last seven chapters must have been written by someone else. According to 1 Chronicles 29:29,30, these last seven chapters were most likely written by Nathan and Gad. We read, “Now the acts of David the king, first and last, behold, they are written in the book of Samuel the seer, and in the book of Nathan the prophet, and in the book of Gad the seer…”. Henceforth, we have good reason to conclude the book of 1 Samuel was written by these three men—Samuel, Nathan and Gad.

Now, as interesting as the human authorship may be, I must hasten to point out that 1 Samuel is a divinely inspired book, meaning God breathed out His words through Samuel, Nathan and Gad. The words of this book, therefore, are the…

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A Transcript Of The Video Study

In our previous study, we reviewed the first nine books of the Old Testament. They cover a total of 2,850 years, which means the remaining thirty books cover only 750 years. The main bulk of this history is recorded in three sets of double books —1 and 2 Samuel, 1 and 2 Kings and 1 and 2 Chronicles.

Now, let me remind you, when I drew up this chronological chart of Bible books, it had to fit on an A4 sheet of paper. For that reason, the timeline zigzags on the page. Beginning with Genesis, the books follow a straight line to 2 Kings, under which we have the book of Psalms, Song of Solomon, Proverbs and Ecclesiastes. But then, the timeline continues at the top of the page, following the divided kingdom of Israel and the prophets. Then the timeline continues with the exile and return of Judah.

Henceforth, this section of history may be divided into three parts: First, the United Kingdom of Israel; Second, the Divided Kingdom of Israel; Third, the Exile and Regathering Of Judah. Let’s begin with:

First, the United Kingdom of Israel.

The United Kingdom of Israel began in 1095 BC and ended in 975 BC, a total span of 120 years. The historic narrative of this time period is recorded in 1 and 2 Samuel, 1 Kings and…

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A Transcript Of The Video Study

This is the 23rd study in the series, and it is my purpose to review with you what we have covered so far in our reading of the first nine books of the Old Testament. As I have just mentioned, we have completed the first nine books of the Old Testament. Now, when I say the first nine books, I am referring to their chronological order. We have read the books of Genesis, Job, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy, Joshua, Judges and Ruth. This happens to be a combined total of 278 chapters, and they have taken approximately 16 hours to read. In other words, we have read just over 20% of the Bible. This is a milestone. You should feel a real sense of…

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A Transcript Of The Video Study

According to the Chronological Chart Of Bible Books, Ruth is the ninth book to appear on the timeline. We believe it was written by Samuel, but the exact time is unknown. It is a divinely inspired book, meaning God breathed out His words through Samuel. The words of this book, therefore, are the words of God. They are able to make us wise unto salvation through faith which is in Christ Jesus. They are profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness, that we might be matured in the faith, throughly furnished unto all good works. (2 Tim 3:15-17)

The name “Ruth” is derived from one of the leading characters of the book. In fact, there are only two books of the Old Testament which are called by the name of a woman—Ruth and Esther. And, there is an interesting contrast between them. For instance, Ruth was a Gentile woman who was…

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A Transcript Of The Video Study

According to the Chronological Chart Of Bible Books, Judges is the eighth book which appears on the timeline. We believe portions of it was written by a number of unknown authors, but that it was completed and compiled by Samuel, sometime after Saul had been appointed king of Israel, around the year 1095 BC. Nevertheless, this is a divinely inspired book, meaning God breathed out His words through those who wrote the book. The words of this book, therefore, are the words of God. They are able to make us wise unto salvation through faith which is in Christ Jesus. They are profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness, that we might be matured in the faith, throughly furnished unto all good works. (2 Tim 3:15-17)

The book receives its name from a period in Israel’s history which was marked by various men and women appointed by God to serve as “Judges” of the people at different stages in the nation’s development. Allow me to give a historic backdrop to the book.

The time of the Judges extends from the death of Joshua to the…

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A Transcript Of The Video Study

According to the Chronological Chart Of Bible Books, Joshua is the seventh book which appears on the timeline. We believe it was written by Joshua, probably around the year 1427 BC, not long before his death. It is a divinely inspired book, meaning God breathed out His words through Joshua. The words of this book, therefore, are the words of God. They are able to make us wise unto salvation through faith which is in Christ Jesus. They are profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness, that we might be matured in the faith, throughly furnished unto all good works. (2 Tim 3:15-17)

The name ‘Joshua’ identifies the leading figure of the book—after the death of Moses, he became the new leader of the nation of Israel. However, the content of the book is much larger than that of a single person. It chronicles the children of Israel conquering the land of Canaan, and, its…

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A Transcript Of The Video Study

According to the Chronological Chart Of Bible Books, Deuteronomy is the sixth book which appears on the timeline. We believe it was written by Moses, just prior to his death in the year 1451 BC. It is a divinely inspired book, meaning God breathed out His words through Moses. The words of this book, therefore, are the words of God. They are able to make the Lord’s people wise unto salvation through faith which is in Christ Jesus. They are profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness, that the Lord’s people might be mature in the faith, throughly furnished unto all good works. (2 Tim 3:15-17)

The Greek translators called this book “Deuteronomy”, meaning the “second law”. In essence, the book is a restatement and explanation of the Mosaic Law given to the new generation which would enter the land of Canaan. The Hebrews called this book “Haddeb-harm”, which means “the words”. This is taken from the…

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For the latter notes of the onscreen presentation, the book of Numbers is mistakenly labeled “Leviticus”.

A Transcript Of The Video Study

According to the Chronological Chart Of Bible Books, Numbers is the fifth book which appears on the timeline. We believe it was written by Moses, sometime around the year 1451 BC, just prior to his death. It is a divinely inspired book, meaning God breathed out His words through Moses. The words of this book, therefore, are the words of God. They are able to make the Lord’s people wise unto salvation through faith which is in Christ Jesus. They are profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness, that the Lord’s people might be mature in the faith, throughly furnished unto all good works. (2 Tim 3:15-17)

The name ‘Numbers’ is derived from the Latin word “numeri”, which is the translation of the Greek word “arithmoi”, from which we get the word ‘arithmetic’. The name was given to the book by the seventy Alexandrian Jews, who in the third century B.C., translated the Old Testament into Greek. No doubt, the Greek translators were impressed by the two numberings God commanded Moses to make of the children of Israel, and that is why they called the book, “Numbers”. However, the Hebrew name for this book is…

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A Transcript Of The Video Study

According to the Chronological Chart Of Bible Books, Leviticus is the fourth book to appear on the timeline. We believe it was written by Moses, probably around the year 1490 BC, sometime after the events recorded in the book. It is a divinely inspired book, meaning God breathed out His words through Moses. The words of this book, therefore, are the words of God. They are able to make the Lord’s people wise unto salvation through faith which is in Christ Jesus. They are profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness, that we might be matured in the faith, throughly furnished unto all good works. (2 Tim 3:15-17)

The name ‘Leviticus’ is derived from the tribe of Levi, and refers to those things pertaining to the Levitical priesthood. Levi was one of the twelve sons of Jacob, and his descendants became one of the twelve tribes of Israel, and it was that tribe—the Tribe of Levi—God set apart to serve as priests among the people. And so, the book of Leviticus picks up where the book of Exodus leaves off. It is all about the ceremonial law, with special reference to the

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A Transcript Of The Video Study

According to the Chronological Chart Of Bible Books, Exodus is the third book to appear on the timeline. We believe it was written by Moses, sometime after the events recorded in the book, which would have been after the year 1491 BC. It is a divinely inspired book. That is, God breathed out His words through Moses, which means the words of this book are the words of God. They are able to make the Lord’s people wise unto salvation through faith which is in Christ Jesus. They are profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness, that the Lord’s people might be mature in the faith, throughly furnished unto all good works. (2 Tim 3:15-17)

The Greek translators labeled this book ‘Exodus’, which means “departure, going out (exit)”. It is a record of the children of Israel’s exodus, or exit, from Egypt.

The book has been divided into 40 chapters, and it takes approximately…

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A Transcript Of The Video Study

According to the Chronological Chart Of Bible Books, Job is the next book to appear along the timeline. We are not certain who wrote the book, nor when it was written, but it was included among the sacred writings of the Old Testament and is considered without question a divinely inspired piece of literature. This means, of course, that the words of this book are the words of God, and they are able to make the Lord’s people wise unto salvation through faith which is in Christ Jesus. My dear friends, the book of Job is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness, that you might be built up in the faith, throughly furnished unto all good works. (2 Tim 3:15-17)

You will notice from the chart, the book is divided into 42 chapters and it takes approximately one hour and forty minutes to read it in a single sitting. The date at the bottom, 1650 BC, indicates the approximate time the…

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A Transcript Of The Video Study

According to the Chronological Chart Of Bible Books, Genesis is the first book which appears on the timeline. We believe it was written by Moses, probably around the year 1491 BC, either during or just after he met with the Lord on Mount Sinai. It is a divinely inspired book, meaning God breathed out His words through Moses. The words of this book, therefore, are the words of God. They are able to make the Lord’s people wise unto salvation through faith which is in Christ Jesus. They are profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness, that the Lord’s people might be mature in the faith, throughly furnished unto all good works. (2 Tim 3:15-17) Yes, my friends, that is what the book of Genesis is abel to do for you! If you are numbered among God’s elect people, the book of Genesis is able to make you wise unto salvation through faith which is in Christ Jesus! The book of Genesis is able to mature you in the faith, furnishing you unto all good works!

The name ‘Genesis’ means “origin”. The book is given this name because in it the…

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A Transcript Of The Video Study

Having completed the preliminary studies for Bible Reading, we are set to begin with the book of Genesis. However, before jumping immediately into the first book of the Bible, I recommend we take a break for a couple of weeks. Between now and then, there are three things I would like for you to do.

First, be sure to download and/or purchase the recommended navigational tools.

To be clear what these are, there is first,

1. The Chronological Charts Of Bible Books, Jared Smith

2. The Framework Of Sovereign Grace, Jared Smith

3. The Synchronological Map Of World History, Sebastian Adams

4. The Key To The Synchronological Map Of…

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A Transcript Of The Video Study

In our previous study, I suggested The Chronological Chart Of Bible Books should be used as a navigational tool as you journey through the books of the Bible. For this study, I would like to explain how the chart works, so that you can proficiently use it as a guide. There are two charts—one for the Old Testament and another for the New Testament. Let’s begin with the Old Testament books.

1. The Old Testament Books.

Allow me to give an explanation of the color coding scheme, which will help you more easily identify the information on the chart. The color purple highlights the books of the Bible; the color blue highlights the number of chapters for each book, along with any Bible texts that are referenced; the color green highlights the length of time it takes to read the book in a single sitting; the color orange highlights the time period covered by each book; the color yellow highlights explanatory notes for the chart.

Now, notice, at the bottom of the chart is a timeline, or time-box, beginning with the…

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The diagrams below are designed to serve as navigational tools as you journey through the books of the Bible. The Chronological Charts Of Bible Books are historic overviews, whereas the Framework Of Sovereign Grace is a theological overview. The chronological charts explain where the books of the Bible fit within a historical context; the framework explains how the books of the Bible are relevant for today. I recommend both sets of diagrams be used when reading through the books of the Bible. The diagrams may be downloaded, which will not only make them more accessible, but will also allow the size of the text to be increased.

The Chronological Charts Of Bible Books…

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A Transcript Of The Video Study

Navigational tools, such as a map and compass, are used by travelers when taking a journey into an unknown country. Well, I would like to suggest a set of tools which will help navigate your journey through the books of the Bible. The first of these tools is—

1. The Chronological Chart Of Bible Books.

As you know from our first study in this series on Bible Reading, the books of the Bible are not listed in chronological order. Rather, they are arranged in a logical order—the first seventeen books of the Old Testament are grouped together as historical books; the last seventeen are prophetical books; and the middle five are experiential books. And then, for the New Testament, the first four are…

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A Transcript Of The Video Study

This is a question I have answered several times in previous studies. However, it happens to be a question which seems to linger in the minds of many church goers, especially those who have been influenced by Dispensational teachings. As I pointed out in our previous study, there are many people who view the Old Testament to be a revelation of God’s Law, which sinners were responsible to obey in order to have a relationship with God, whereas they see the New Testament as a revelation of God’s grace where sinners are responsible to believe on Christ in order to have a relationship with God. When those who believe such things are questioned about whether sinners are saved by works or by grace, they will affirm that sinners have always been saved by the grace of God. They will say, “During the Old Testament era, by grace, God enabled sinners to obey the law, whereas during the New Testament era, by grace, God enables sinners to believe on Christ.” Of course, this is nothing short of a mockery of the God of grace and a perversion of the grace of God.

As I have shown you, the labels Old Testament (Covenant) and New Testament (Covenant) refer to one and the same covenant—the Covent of Grace. Both parts of the Bible are a revelation of the…

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A Transcript Of The Video Study

In our previous study, I attempted to show you how the Mosaic Covenant is aligned with the Covenant of Works and the Covenant of Grace. In essence, the Covenant of Works and the Covenant of Grace are the two spiritual and perpetual covenants under which members of the human race are in relationship to and with God. Throughout the course of history, all unregenerate sinners (Jews and Gentiles) are in relationship to God under the authority of the Covenant of Works, whereas all regenerate sinners (Jews and Gentiles) are in relationship with God under the authority of the Covenant of Grace. As for the Mosaic Covenant, it was a national and temporal covenant designed only for the Jewish people as a nation. Technically speaking, it had absolutely nothing to do with one’s spiritual relationship to or with God. It dealt only with terms and promises connected with the Jewish nation, between the time God organized them into a nation around the year 1491 BC and the time God brought the nation to an end around the year AD 70. Having said that, there were elements of the Mosaic Covenant which reflected the Heart Law under the Covenant of Works and the Gospel Law under the Covenant of Grace, but these were only reflections of these two spiritual and perpetual covenants.

Let us now move forward to the subject of this study—To What Do The Labels “Old Testament” And “New Testament” Refer? Well, the two Testaments are divided by the birth of Christ in 4 BC. The Old Testament scriptures record God’s revelation of the gospel before…

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A Transcript Of The Video Study

In our previous study, I attempted to explain how the Covenant of Works and the Covenant of Grace differ from the Mosaic Covenant. In my closing statements, I provided an outline for the law which governs each covenant. Under the Covenant of Works, the Heart Law is a twofold law ordained by God for all unregenerate sinners—(1) to love God supremely, and (2) to love one’s neighbor as one’s self. Under the Covenant of Grace, the Gospel Law is ordained by God for all regenerate sinners, which is nothing other than the sinner’s spiritual union with Christ. Under the Mosaic Covenant, the Law of Moses is a threefold law ordained by God for the Jewish people as a nation—(1) as the Jewish people were to be a holy nation, God gave them a Moral Law; (2) as the Jewish people were to be a righteous nation, God gave them a Civil Law; (3) as the Jewish people were to be a religious nation, God gave them a Ceremonial Law. These are the three branches of the Mosaic Law, and together they make up all that God required of the Jewish people as a nation. This covenant and its law remained in operation for around 1,500 years, from the time God organized the Jewish people into a nation under the leadership of Moses in 1491 BC, to the time the Jewish nation came to an end with the destruction of Jerusalem in AD 70. During those centuries, God’s relationship with the Jewish nation was based upon the authority and governed by the parameters of the Mosaic Covenant and the Law of Moses. But as I have shown you, it is an entirely separate covenant from that of Works and Grace. Having said that, there are elements of the Covenant of Works and the Covenant of Grace which are reflected in the Mosaic Covenant. For this study, I would like to highlight some of the more salient ways in which the Mosaic Covenant reflected the Covenants of Works and Grace.

Let’s begin with the Covenant of Works. You will notice, the first branch of the Mosaic Law is a reflection of the Heart Law. This first branch is sometimes called the Moral Law, and it was given in the form of ten commandments. These commandments are based upon, and are an application of, the Heart Law. The first four commandments are an application of the…

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A Transcript Of The Video Study

In our previous study, we considered the significance of the covenants God made with Noah, Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, and how they differ from the Covenants of Works and Grace. In this study, I would like to examine the same topic, but with reference to the covenant God made with Moses, otherwise known as the Mosaic Covenant. We read about this covenant in the book of Exodus, when God organized the Jewish people into a nation. Thereafter, the Mosaic Covenant assumes a prominent position in the Old and New Testament scriptures, for it outlines the parameters around which the Jewish people as a nation were in relationship to God. Remember, the Jewish race began around the year 2000 BC, when Abraham was born. Around 80 years later, God made a covenant with…

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A Transcript Of The Video Study

In our previous study, I pointed out that the leading message of the Bible revolves around the idea of a covenant. There are two perpetual covenants under which members of the human race are in relationship with and accountable to God—the Covenant of Works and the Covenant of Grace. These are the two covenants introduced by God to Adam and Eve in the garden of Eden, and they have remained the only two covenants under which members of the human race have been in relationship to God throughout the course of history. However, there are a number of other covenants mentioned in the Bible, which raises the question—of what significance are those covenants and how do they differ from the Covenant of Works and the Covenant of Grace? Allow me to increase the size of the timeline, in order that I might more easily highlight some of these other covenants.

Among the more prominent covenants recorded in the book of Genesis are the covenants God made with…

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A Transcript Of The Video Study

In our previous studies, I have highlighted the importance of reading the Bible against the backdrop of a timeline. There are three main divisions of a biblical timeline—the first 2,000 years, between the creation of the world and the birth of Abraham, which are focused on the Gentiles; the second 2,000 years, between the birth of Abraham and the birth of Christ, which are focused on the Jews; the third 2,000 years, between the birth of Christ and our present day, which are focused on the Jews and Gentiles. I have also explained the significance of the Jewish people—they have ended as a nation, never to be restored, but they continue as a race to this day. Well, this leads us to the broader question, What Is The Leading Message Of The Bible?

The message of the Bible can be reduced to a single idea—testament. Now, you’re familiar with the word testament. It is the label given to the first and second parts of the Bible—the Old Testament and the New Testament. Another word that is used…

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A Transcript Of The Video Study

In our previous study, I highlighted four reasons why the Jewish people as a nation are the focal point in the Old Testament scriptures:

1. They are the lineage through which the Messiah would be born.
2. They served as the repository for the Old Testament scriptures.
3. They served as a house of gospel witness.
4. They are a parable of God’s spiritually elect people.

It is this last reason which underscores the distinction between two groups of God’s elect people. To better explain this point, allow me to increase the size of the timeline and align it with TriUne Jehovah.

The first group are the eternal, gracious and spiritually elect unto salvation; the second group are the temporal, racial and nationally elect which is only a picture of salvation. Do you see? The Jewish people as an elect nation are designed to…

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A Transcript Of The Video Study

As we saw from the previous study, there are three biblical divisions of history, equally divided into 2,000 year time periods. The focal point of the first and last divisions are all the nations of the earth—the word Gentile is used to identify anyone who is not Jewish. Whereas, the focal point of the second time period is that of the Jewish people as a nation.

This view of history is comparable to an hourglass. An hourglass is a device designed to measure the passage of time. The top and bottom ends of the glass are large cylinders, with sand filling one end. The middle section of the…

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