• Featured,  Job Hupton

    A Blow Struck At The Root Of Fullerism

    The following letter originated in a conversation upon Mr. Fuller’s sentiment, viz. “faith the duty of the unconverted,” between the writer and the gentleman to whom it is addressed, in which this question was put, by the former, to the latter. Is the peculiar faith of God’s elect, or the faith of the operation of God, a duty of the moral law? It has long appeared to me, that this question is the grand hinge upon which the controversy between Mr. Fuller, and others, about faith, turns; and that, upon this ground, the Fullerian system must stand or fall; must be fully established, or eternally demolished. Some argue against Mr. Fuller’s notion, from man’s inability, concluding, that the faith in dispute cannot be the natural…

  • Featured,  Jared Smith on the Biblical Covenants

    3 The Earthly And Temporary Covenants: Part 1

    Some of the points I cover in this teaching video: The Presbyterians and the Traditional Reformed Baptists believe God established a conditional covenant of grace with sinners (Gen 3:14,15), the substance of which is one and the same with the succeeding covenants, administered differently at various stages in history. The 1689 Federalists, a branch of the Reformed Baptist movement, believe God promised to establish a conditional covenant of grace with sinners (Gen 3:14,15), the pledge of which was renewed in each of the succeeding covenants, and finally established on mount Calvary with the death of Christ. I do not believe the scriptures support this notion of a conditional covenant of grace, and therefore the covenantal frameworks of the foregoing groups are erroneous. In my view,…

  • Featured,  George Ella on Doctrinal Matters

    Dealing With Birds Of False Feathers

    Dear Friends, The two letters copied below were written in response to charges of Antinomianism, Hyper-Calvinism and false analyses of Fullerism coming from the Founders Journal and their supporters. These accusations were never justified and made by people who did not know me from Adam and had not read my books. One particular person, now long departed from the Reformed faith he professed then to hold, was giving an after-dinner jocular speech in which I was mentioned disdainfully when he was asked by an unamused table-guest why he condemned me so violently and joked about me so unbrotherly yet did not appear to know what I taught. He received the answer that the speaker did not have to read me to denounce me. The brother…

  • Featured,  Peter Meney on Practical Matters

    Seeing God’s Glory

    “And he said, I will make all my goodness pass before thee, and I will proclaim the name of the LORD before thee; and will be gracious to whom I will be gracious, and will shew mercy on whom I will shew mercy.”—Exodus 33:19 A Daring Request Have you ever thought what an daring request Moses made when he asked God, “I beseech thee, shew me thy glory”? What would possess a man to ask such a thing? Was he merely curious? Was he presumptuous? Was be being foolish or bold? Have you considered that Moses might be desperate? If he was, it was with good reason. Moses’ confidence in God had been shaken. He no longer knew whether God was with the Children of…

  • Featured,  John E. Hazelton Sermons

    Should It Be So?

    A Sermon Preached By John E. Hazelton When His Only Son Died, August 1st, 1909 "Should it be according to thy mind?”—Job 34:33 The Book of Leviticus contains a series of very blessed illustrations of the Gospel of our God, of the Person and of the work of the Lord Jesus Christ. When we are enabled prayerfully to read it with a spiritual eye, by the side of the gospel as recorded in the New Testament, and in the light of the Epistle to the Hebrews, we are favoured to become somewhat instructed in the things that make for our eternal peace. It is Jehovah Himself who is speaking in nearly every verse in this book. I would draw your attention first, ere we pass…

  • Featured,  Shackelford on Baptist History (Complete)

    Chapter 11: Waldensean Period (Continued)

    History tells us that in the dark ages, the Waldenses spread themselves all over Europe, but were everywhere treated as “the filth of the world and the offscouring of all things." Each succeeding generation seemed to increase in hatred towards these unfortunate people, and gave vent to its pent up fury with increased energy. Mr. Jones says, "During the dark ages which succeeded the invasion of Europe by the barbarous nations, when feudal anarchy distracted the civil governments and a flood of superstition had deluged the church, Christianity, banished from the seats of empire, and loathing the monkish abodes of indolence and vice, meekly retired into the sequestered valleys of Piedmont. Finding there a race of men unarrayed in hostile armor, uncontaminated by the doctrines…