• Samuel Walker

    The Life And Testimony Of Samuel Walker

    The memory of Samuel Abraham Walker, M.A., Rector of St. Mary-le-Port, Bristol, and founder of the Clifton Conference in 1862, is gratefully cherished He was a man of spiritual force, a doughty champion on Protestant platforms and never ashamed of the creature-humbling doctrines of grace. His hand and his heart were ever with those who were one with him in Christ. The Clifton Conference continues, under the Rev. James Ormiston, as the October annual gathering of many of the Lord's people of various sections of the one Church who assemble in the name of "the chiefest among ten thousand and the altogether lovely."' A similar Conference was held at Aylestone, Leicestershire, under the auspices of George W. Straton, M.A., the rector; but upon his death…

  • John Bunyan

    The Life And Testimony Of John Bunyan

    John Bunyan was born at Elstow, near Bedford, in 1628. His father was a tinker, and, concerning his humble birth, Bunyan says, "My descent was of a low and inconsiderable generation, my father's house being of that rank that is meanest and most despised of all the families of the land.'' But, poor as his parents were, they did not neglect sending their children to school, for which John felt very grateful in after years. At a very early age he acquired the sad habit of swearing, for which he became notorious, but he proved "the way of transgressors to be hard! for, after spending a day thus in sin, he was scared and terrified at night with fearful dreams, and apprehensions of devils and…

  • John Bunyan

    Bi-Centenary Of The Death Of John Bunyan

    Much of the liberty we now enjoy as Christians is owing to two great historical facts which transpired in the years 1588 and 1688—the defeat of the Spanish Armada, and the accession of the Protestant dynasty to the throne of England. We, however, dare not withhold at the present moment stating our firm conviction that the iron hand of ROMANISM WILL YET AGAIN PREVAIL and reign in this country, at least for a limited period. It is not difficult to imagine what the state of England would be if the sacred Scriptures were as rigidly forbidden to be possessed and read by the public as they were in the Middle Ages. God defend the right. JOHN BUNYAN'S DEATH, AUGUST 12TH, 1688. We owe a great…

  • Richard Davis

    The Early History Of The Independent Church At Rothwell, A Defense Of Richard Davis

    It would be well perhaps to state the reasons by which we were induced to write the following small section of church history. Having read the work of Mr. Coleman on the Independent Churches of Northamptonshire, it seemed to us that, despite its many excellencies, the accounts were too general, and the particulars too isolated to yield all the interest or instruction that might be obtained from a knowledge of the olden dissent of the county. We thought that if, leaving the work of Mr. Coleman to answer as a general record, some old and interesting section of county dissenting history were worked out with more full connection and details it might supply an apparent need, placing us in closer connection with our nonconforming ancestry,…

  • Richard Davis

    The Life And Testimony Of Richard Davis

    John Gill’s Preface To Richard Davis’ “Hymns Composed On Several Subjects, And On Divers Occasions” (1748) As I had the honor in my youth of knowing the worthy author of the following hymns, being born (at Kettering in Northamptonshire) and brought up within a very few miles of the place (Rowel, also Rothwell, the same county) where he statedly ministered, I was the rather inclined at request to write a preface to them. His memory has been always precious to me, partly on account of his great regard for my education, for which he was heartily concerned, and also for my spiritual and eternal welfare. I well remember, though very young, that having discovered some eager desire after some part of literature, he though fit…

  • William Borows

    The Life And Death Of William Borrows

    Our obituary of Wednesday last (April 7) contained a notice of the decease of this faithful minister of Christ, who long and successfully laboured in the neighbourhood of London. The Rev. William Borrows was a native of Derby, and studied at St.Edmund Hall, Oxford, under the present Bishop of Calcutta, who also gave him his first introduction to the metropolis, by placing him in the pulpit of St. John's, Bedford Row, during his own temporary absence. In 1815, Mr. Borrows became the Incumbent Minister of St. Paul's, Clapham; and for fully twenty years combined the duties of that appointment with the Sunday Evening Lectureship of St. Luke's, Middlesex. In both places his ministry was greatly valued for his faithfulness, zeal, and ability. Firmly attached to…