• Peter Meney's Scripture Meditations

    Sing A New Song

    The beauty of this chapter will be enhanced by at once recognising the identity of the Lord’s servant. In the previous chapter the Holy Spirit left open the question of the identity of the ‘righteous man from the east’. This time there is no doubt. Matthew in his Gospel specifies the Lord Jesus Christ to be God’s chosen servant, God’s elect in whom His soul delights. It is the Lord Jesus in His mediator role who is endued with Holy Spirit strength to bring salvation to the Gentiles. Christ’s tender care In this passage we read both of the Lord’s successful deliverance of His people and His tender care towards them who are bruised and troubled. Our Lord Jesus in His humanity was fortified and…

  • Peter Meney's Scripture Meditations

    I Have Chosen Thee

    Gospel days are in view as Isaiah begins to preach his sermon concerning the Messiah and His saving work. In chapter 40 the Lord repeatedly asked, ‘Have ye not known? Have ye not heard?’ These questions served to emphasis the Messiah’s divinity and unique ministry which God’s prophets had long foretold amongst the Jews. However, Christ’s ministry would be expansive and worldwide. Now the Lord calls on the isles, that is, the Gentile nations beyond Israel to present themselves before the Lord to witness an account of Christ’s deeds and irrefutable power. The righteous man The evidence concerns the Lord’s own work in raising up ‘the righteous man from the East’ and various suggestions are given to identify this person. Some suggest Abraham who was…

  • Peter Meney's Scripture Meditations

    Comfort Ye My People

    Our progress through Isaiah’s prophecy has brought us to a new section. Of course, there has been much of Christ in earlier chapters as we have seen. There have been details about His incarnation and the virgin birth as well as anticipation of what Christ would accomplish at the cross for His remnant people. However, here we step through into the more evangelical and spiritual part of this prophecy. This reaches to and includes the whole Gospel age from the coming of John the Baptist to the second coming of Christ. A worrying time At the end of the previous chapter Isaiah spoke of Judah’s exile and captivity in Babylon after the death of Hezekiah. Now Isaiah himself is to comfort the Lord’s captive people.…

  • Peter Meney's Scripture Meditations

    The House Of Precious Things

    At the end of chapter 37 we learned about the destruction of the Assyrian army and Sennacherib’s assassination in the temple of his god. Chapter 38 spoke of Hezekiah being sick unto death and his miraculous restoration. In chapter 39 we meet the Babylonians. This people, at the time subject to Assyria, would soon be the new regional superpower. God uses the rise and fall of empires to accomplish His will and to educate His people. May the Lord grant us grace to take the long view of God’s sovereign purpose and not be fretful about day to day disappointments.

  • Peter Meney's Scripture Meditations

    The Sun Returned Ten Degrees

    Once again we have an embarrassment of riches in this passage. It is like a Russian doll of miracles; miracle within miracle, wonder within wonder. Yet the miracles are only the start. ‘The writing of Hezekiah’, this confession of the king in his sickness and upon his recovery, is full of spiritual wisdom and the earnest wrestling of a child of God. In facing his own mortality this dying man opened his heart and his mouth to the Saviour whom he loved and bequeathed to the church a blessed testimony of God’s grace, faithfulness and mercy. A lesson for all time Because the phrase ‘in those days’ is somewhat imprecise it is not clear exactly when this sickness afflicted Hezekiah, or indeed the order of…

  • Peter Meney's Scripture Meditations

    Spread It Before The LORD

    Our passage begins a section of four historical chapters (Isaiah 36-39) that supply a link between the first and second parts of Isaiah’s prophecy. These chapters are almost identical to passages in 2 Kings 18-20 and rather than being prophetic relate to incidents in the life of Hezekiah, king of Judah. The first two chapters conclude Isaiah’s references to Assyria which had long been the dominant military power in the region. The latter two signal the beginning of a new series of prophecies concerning the Babylonian Empire. These prophecies provide Isaiah’s readers with still grander views of the coming Messiah and the glory and power of God in salvation.