• Anne Askew

    The Life And Martyrdom Of Anne Askew

    Drunken with the blood of the saints, and with the blood of the martyrs of Jesus," is one of the features of the woman, described in the Apocalypse, upon whose forehead was this name written, "Mystery, Babylon the great, the mother of harlots and abominations of the earth." The Popes of Rome, in virtue of their assumed right to govern the souls and bodies of men, and to say what is and what is not to be believed, have ever waged war with those who have dared, even upon Scriptural and patriotic grounds, to oppose their power and resist their tyranny. Ever jealous of their dogmas and their institutions, these pretended successors of the Apostle Peter, proudly styling themselves "vicars of Jesus Christ," have hunted…

  • Roland Taylor

    The Life And Martyrdom Of Roland Taylor

    The trial and martyrdom of Rowland Taylor, as narrated by John Foxe in his "Acts and Monuments," is considered by some to be the finest portion of that valuable and wonderful work. To us this opinion does not seem extravagant, for, among the many sublime instances of Christian heroism recorded by the indefatigable martyrologist, it would be difficult to find one more sublime and more interesting than the case of the learned vicar of Hadleigh. His zealous care over his flock, his courageous determination not to leave the country, but face his enemies; his manly demeanour before Chancellor Gardiner, his dignified replies to the surrilous assertions of that prelate, his calm anticipation of a cruel death, and his heroic conduct at the stake, are but…

  • John Hooper

    The Life And Martyrdom Of John Hooper

    “Of whom the world was not worthy." This epitaph the Apostle Paul penned to the memory of those illustrious heroes of Old Testament history—heroes who walked in the fear of God, and fought stoutly for His honour and glory, by obeying the commands of their Almighty Creator rather than submit to the dictates of puny man. This same epitaph, we are assured, may be safely and as appropriately inscribed to the memory of such men as John Hooper, who, at a period much nearer our own time, stoutly vindicated God's honour and glory, by proclaiming the Gospel of His grace in a day when power and influence were arrayed on the side of its enemies. Hooper and his martyred comrades may be justly ranked among…

  • John Rogers

    The Life And Martyrdom Of John Rogers

    The reign of Queen Mary will ever be associated with burning stakes and persecuting edicts. In all parts of the land—north, south, east, and west—men and women were haled to prison for the truth's sake. Many were the modes of suffering which they endured, for all that human ingenuity could devise was made use of in prolonging and aggravating the tortures of these martyrs. Looking at these events exclusively from this standpoint, and only taking into consideration the brutal nature of the deeds and the trials of the victims, causes one almost to drop the pen, and cease from rehearsing facts at which the heart sickens. Our indignation rises to a very high pitch when we read how men could torture their fellow-creatures in such…

  • Laurence Saunders

    The Life And Martyrdom Of Laurence Saunders

    Laurence Saunders, the subject of our present paper, was the second martyr in Queen Mary's reign. His parents were of good position, and thus able to give their son a liberal education. At an early age Saunders commenced his education at Eton school, and from there he went to King's College, Cambridge, where he made rapid and considerable progress in the learning of the age. On leaving the University, he was apprenticed to a London merchant, Sir William Chester, who was afterwards Sheriff of London the same year that Saunders was burnt at the stake. But a mercantile life proved very unsuitable to the tastes and inclinations of Saunders, as his master perceived, so his indentures were given him, and the apprentice was free. Saunders…

  • John Lambert

    The Life And Martyrdom Of John Lambert

    This distinguished martyr was born in the county of Norfolk, and educated at the university of Cambridge. He became a very proficient scholar and a master of Greek and Latin, so that he translated several books from those languages into the English tongue. Through the instrumentality of Bilney, Lambert renounced the errors of Rome, and allied himself with those who were propagating the everlasting truths of the pure and unadulterated Gospel of Jesus Christ. His belief in the truth becoming known to the Papists, Lambert thought it advisable to flee; and so he crossed the sea, and joined Frith and Tyndale, with whom he remained more than a year. He was appointed chaplain to the English factory at Antwerp, which preferment he owed to his…